3 things to consider (and avoid) before you go on live TV

Last week was a study in what happens when props fail, both in public presentations and media interviews.

Props can be a great addition to help make your point, but please proceed with caution. You risk more by using the prop than not, so here are three things to consider (and avoid) before you go on live TV:

1. Use spell check! This floor poster made us LOL.

Last week, Sen. Maria Cantwell (now referred to as “Sen. Cantspell”) was trying to make a point against the Republican health care bill, yet forgot to spell check her prop. #YouHadOneJob

2. Props should never make an appearance in media interviews, and Kellyanne Conway proved why. Though she was using her flash cards to clear up confusion about the Russia saga, it didn’t seem to have the intended effect.

(We’re confused. We don’t understand.)

But also, the signs were a distraction from her main message. Instead of listening to what she said, we tuned her out to watch as she awkwardly broke the frame to pull the signs into the shot. When you have to pull props into a live shot, you’re doing it wrong.

3. Don’t be the punchline. Beware of any potential for a screen shot to be made into a meme. We saw this happen to President Trump when he lifted up a copy of a just-signed executive order. The prop took on a life of its own, not only creating memes, but also a meme generator.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

TUESDAY TIP: Amazon Prime Day

In honor of Amazon Prime Day, a beloved national holiday, we thought we’d help fill your cart with everything you need for your next TV interview.

Our goal is to make sure you present your best self on camera, so we’ve compiled a list of the Top 6 products we recommend to make you shine (not literally) in your interviews.

You’ll thank us later…

1. Crest Whitestrips Supreme Professional Strength

2. Brush On Block Broad Spectrum SPF 30 Mineral Powder Sunscreen

3. Essie Nail Polish in Ballet Slippers

4. Batiste Dry Shampoo

5. Revlon Ultra HD Matte Lipcolor

6. MAC Studio Fix Pressed Powder

 

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

TUESDAY TIP: “Our pets’ heads are falling off!”

 

“The sky is falling! The sky is falling!” – Chicken Little
“Our pets’ heads are falling off!” – Lloyd Christmas, Dumb and Dumber
“Hundreds of thousands of Americans will die in the streets!” – [Insert Name of Democratic Senator]

Maybe an understatement, but the Democrats don’t approve the Senate’s version of the health care bill and they’d like everyone to know it.

Fox & Friends highlighted a few of the best quotes this morning:

 

SEN. BERNIE SANDERS (I-VT): I know this is a sensitive issue. I’m going to raise it. And that is that the horrible and unspeakable truth is that if this legislation were to pass, thousands of our fellow Americans every single year will die.

REP. NANCY PELOSI (D-CA): We do know that the — many more people, millions, hundreds of thousands of people will die if this bill passes.

SEN. AL FRANKEN (D-MN): One to 2,000 people will die if you cut 750,000 people from Medicaid. So that means you’re killing one to 2,000 — killing them.

 

Here’s the thing…they’re wrong…

Regardless if you think this policy is RINO (Repeal in Name Only) or the greatest health care bill EVER, the numbers just don’t add up. Hundreds of thousands of people won’t die if this bill passes, but we can’t expect reason to prevail just yet. So, how can you have a calm and thoughtful discussion in the meantime?

Good thing it’s Tuesday, B² day.

Here’s this week’s likely media question and the B² (block and bridge) that sets the narrative straight:

 

Q: “How can you support passage of a bill that guarantees millions will lose health coverage?”

B²: “Millions will lose heath coverage if we do nothing. That’s why we can’t just look at this bill as the only answer, but we also have to look to future reforms that can fix the system, lower cost, and improve quality of care for EVERYONE. We can get there by…”

 

 

Wherever you take the conversation next, use facts to your advantage. The Left will appeal to emotion, which means you have to respond with emotion as well. But then pivot to facts that highlight Obamacare’s failures and how this plan seeks to right those wrongs. You have facts on your side, use them.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

TUESDAY TIP: “The ceiling is the roof.”

The NBA Finals are done and basketball is over for the season, but we’re not ready to say goodbye just yet.

On this Tip Tuesday, let’s look to the G.O.A.T., Michael Jordan, as we consider what not to do in our media interviews.

During halftime of a high-stakes basketball game against Duke (the chief rival of his alma mater), Jordan told us “the ceiling is the roof.” Excuse me, what?

Jordan was attempting to highlight how bright the future is for UNC and its athletic program by stating “the ceiling is the roof.” To which we say A for effort, but no dice.

In response, social media blew up, jokes were made at MJ’s expense all over the Internet, and t-shirts with the phrase quickly went on sale.

What Jordan meant to say, nobody knows. Maybe it was “reach for the stars” or “the sky’s the limit.” Regardless, we’re going to use this as a teachable moment.

 

You should include examples and metaphors in your talking points, but only if you use them correctly. Otherwise, you risk launching a swag sale and meme competition. If your goal is to get your message out (as it should be), make sure you know what you’re talking about.

 

Mixed metaphors happen to the best of us, so here’s an exhaustive list to confirm you’re not throwing the bath out with the baby water.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

TUESDAY TIP: A blueprint for hostile questions

Last week marked a stunning moment in America as we watched Sen. Bernie Sanders and other Senators repeatedly attack Russ Vought, the administration’s nominee for deputy director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), not on his qualifications for the job but on his personal faith.

Irate that Vought stood by his Christian beliefs, Sanders concluded his line of questioning by stating: “I would simply say, Mr. Chairman, that this nominee is really not someone who is what this country is supposed to be about.”

Though he didn’t come out and say it, Sanders seemed to suggest one’s faith makes him or her unfit to serve public office. (Have you even read the Constitution?! Please see the First Amendment.)

The exchange between several U.S. Senators and a professing Christian was shocking, but there is good news. Vought gave us a blueprint for how to respond to hostile questions – faith-based or otherwise.

On this Tip Tuesday, let’s analyze Vought’s stellar performance:

 

He did two very important things: 1) he stated what he is, not what he’s not and 2) he never repeated accusations.

 

By only stating what he is and not repeating accusations, Vought successfully stood his ground and won the exchange. He wasn’t defensive, he was confident. And he won the sympathy of the viewing audience.

Now, go and do likewise.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

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