TUESDAY TIP: Correcting the host

We’ve all been there. An introduction gone wrong, and no one knows if it’s polite to offer a correction. But what happens when it occurs in a live interview in front of millions (rough estimate) of people?

 

Q: “Should I correct the host?”

A: “No, and here’s why…”

 

Offering a correction can break your rapport with the host, embarrass them, or lead to an uncomfortable moment which could sidetrack your interview. Instead, extend some grace and let it slide. This also applies to fellow guests/panelists who mispronounce your name, title, organization, or a line in your bio.

But like any good rule, there is an exception – DMG recommends correcting the host or fellow guest/panelist if they say something that changes the essence, meaning, or intention of what you are saying or have said. Jump in and politely clarify if you feel like they misrepresented you and/or your message.

ICYMI, past Tuesday Tips have focused on sunglassessleeves, and sweat. All are worth a read as the temps increase this week.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

B²: House Health Care Bill

Some things just go together and should never be separated – birthdays and cake, October and baseball, Beyoncé and Jay Z.

But a new pair has been making headlines in recent days: the House health care bill and pre-existing conditions.

Every single interview/article/social media post that addresses the AHCA, also addresses pre-existing conditions. This means you have no excuse for stumbling through an answer to a question that addresses both. You will be asked about pre-existing conditions in relation to health care, it’s only a matter of time.

So, let’s practice.

Good thing it’s Tuesday, B² day.

Here’s this week’s likely media question and the B² (block and bridge) that sets the narrative straight:

 

Q: “What about people with pre-existing conditions? Will they lose coverage?”

B²: “No. Coverage for those with pre-existing conditions will remain, even after the Senate makes changes. But as we try to move forward and implement good health care policy, we have to consider not only those with pre-existing conditions, but also those who lost their doctors and plans, and experienced exorbitant price increases, under ObamaCare. <Insert talking point>.”

 

Wherever you take the conversation next, don’t shy away from the pre-existing conditions debate. This is a complicated issue that will take time to get right. While we wait for Capitol Hill to work it out, now’s the time to have conversations about what ObamaCare got wrong and how we can fix it so good health care policy prevails.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

B²: Energy + the Environment

On Friday, President Trump signed an executive order to open up U.S. energy resources by removing a ban on off-shore drilling in several key locations. Then, on Saturday, Washington D.C. watched another environmental/climate protest take over the city.

With the environment in the news this week, to say it’s a “hot” button issue is an understatement.

But how do you come out on top in your interviews? Or have an intelligent conversation with someone who believes your science isn’t the same as their science?

Good thing it’s Tuesday, B² day.

Here’s this week’s likely media question and the B² (block and bridge) that sets the narrative straight:

 

Q: “Do you think Trump’s Executive Order to allow for more drilling will hurt the environment?”

B²: “Not at all. In fact, it would be both environmentally and economically irresponsible to fail to steward all the resources we have here in the U.S. <Insert talking point>.”

 

The talking point you pivot to can highlight job creation, economic growth, national security—relying on hostile governments for energy, as well as the environment. Wherever you take the conversation next, emphasize that an all-of-the-above energy strategy will help us better steward our environment for this and future generations.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

B²: Government Shutdown

Friday’s the day!

The day when, if no deal is struck to keep the government open, government employees will find out just how “non-essential” many of them are.

Because talk of the government shutdown will occupy nearly every media outlet until Friday, palace intrigue, negotiation updates, and whip counts will rule the news cycle.

How do you answer a question in your interviews about a government shutdown without getting into the weeds of on-again off-again deals that might never pan out?

Good thing it’s Tuesday, B² day.

Here’s this week’s likely media question and the B² (block and bridge) that sets the narrative straight:

 

Q: “Do you think the government will shut down?”

B²: “We’ll know on Thursday whether or not Congress can find agreement, but regardless, we can’t keep putting a Band-Aid on the major problem of SPENDING TOO MUCH. We’ve been here before and we’ll be here again unless we <insert talking point on spending>.”

 

Wherever you take the conversation next, keep the emphasis on spending and the need to curb it. The key is to get your main message out—hopefully one of limited government and less spending—while fighting back the false narrative that special interest programs must be added into the bill at the eleventh hour to make it “passable.”

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

B²: Tax Day

Tax Day is the worst.

It stands as a reminder of how much money we’ve given the government in the last 365 days (interest free!) thanks to a complicated code no one understands.

And yet, our debt is hovering dangerously close to $20 trillion. TWENTY TRILLION DOLLARS.

Everyone knows tax reform needs to happen, but the debate remains over when and how. As Capitol Hill prepares to have this tough conversation, the media is ready and waiting to ask you about it. Do you know how to talk taxes and tax reform?

Good thing it’s Tuesday, B² day.

Here’s this week’s likely media question and the B² (block and bridge) that sets the narrative straight:

 

Q: “You keep talking about cutting taxes, but we’re $20 trillion in debt. Shouldn’t we raise taxes on the wealthy in order to pay off our debt?”

(Option #1) B²: “Rather than asking Americans to pay more, Congress should be asking themselves how they can spend less. <Insert talking point>.”

(Option #2) B²: “Washington has a spending problem, not a revenue problem. <Insert talking point>.”

 

Wherever you take the conversation next, remember that it’s important to define the problem in order to fix it; let’s not get lost in the wonky weeds. Focus the conversation on spending and throw out a couple examples of absurd expenditures to prove your point. Most people will agree that simplification and transparency must be upheld as goals one and two in the tax reform process…

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

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